Better Pay and Benefits

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy and San Antonio Central Labor Council President Tom Cummings issued this joint statement in response to a 9-2 vote by the San Antonio City Council to enact an earned paid sick leave ordinance:

Activists for paid sick leave in San Antonio, including representatives of organized labor, have filed more than twice the number of signatures needed to place the measure on the November ballot, the Texas Observer reports.

It's no secret that the financial divide between CEOs and average worker in the U.S. has been growing. But in one case, the pay gap between corporate chiefs and employees has reached almost 6,000-to-1: Weight Watchers, where CEO Mindy Grossman earned 5,908 times what the median worker took home last year.

The labor movement has repeatedly done battle on the minimum wage and other fundamental labor rights with the big, powerful NRA.
Unions are not "third-party representation." They are the working people at a company who speak up together with one voice.

When working people in Austin achieved a historic paid sick leave ordinance, it was just the beginning.

Now, a move to expand the common-sense initiative that promotes both justice and public health in Texas has launched in two more cities.

The objective is to place a proposed ordinance identical to Austin's on the ballot in both San Antonio and Dallas. Well-attended news conferences displaying a broad array of supporters took place in both cities today.

The notion of bringing home 80 cents for every dollar pocketed by a man on a national basis is unsettling enough. But it's even more startling when those lost wages are added up.

Overall, it amounts to $10,000 in lost wages a year, says Debra Ness, president of the National Partnership for Women and Families. That chunk of cash could pay for 14 more months of child care, 74 more weeks of groceries and an additional 10 months of rent for the average woman.

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy issued this statement in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.:

“If you were a sentient human being on this day in 1968, the first thing you likely felt on hearing of Martin Luther King’s death was anger. Fifty years later, much remains to be angry about: attacks on immigrants, on voting rights, on the LGBTQ community and, sadly still, on people of color. The ‘Poor Peoples’ Campaign,’ from which ‘I AM 2018’ derives, is as relevant now as it was in 1968.”

In a primary election with few consistent themes, the working people of the Texas AFL-CIO COPE helped make history and check the advance of a right-wing agenda that would undermine public schools, reduce access to health care and further compromise the future of immigrants, Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy said.

In a primary election with few consistent themes, the working people of the Texas AFL-CIO COPE helped make history and check the advance of a right-wing agenda that would undermine public schools, reduce access to health care and further compromise the future of immigrants, Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy said.